the wandering chick
...Shorebirds of the Texas coastline
(and maybe of other places, too)

Two things prompted the creation of this page. I recently took a trip down to Surfside, Texas, with a travel friend to check out the place. It's located down by Freeport, over the San Luis Pass off Galveston's west end. We were told of driftwood that collects there, and that's what piqued my interest in going, not knowing we would happen upon a colony of Roseate spoonbills. The pink beauties were much more exciting than piles of driftwood, which, by the way, we never found. The spoonbills we came upon held our attention captive for close to or more than an hour. We felt we were floating on soft pink clouds.

Another reason for creating this page is that I noticed my Galveston page, where I was posting my bird shots, was becoming nearly monopolized by...well, bird shots. I feel I have enough new ones to justify a separate page dedicated just to the shorebirds. Afterall, there's a LOT more to Galveston than the birds.

A link between the two pages will make it easy to move from one to the other. It's at the bottom of this page. Enjoy and thanks for visiting.

spoonbills and white egret
spoonbills
spoonbills
spoonbills
Nestled in the brush among the spoonbills were several yellow-crowned night herons. They all seemed to co-habitate well. In fact, it's not uncommon for ibises, herons and spoonbills to share nesting grounds.
spoonbills
spoonbills
spoonbills
spoonbills
spoonbills
spoonbills
spoonbills
I can't tell if the smaller bird has yellow feet, which would make it a snowy egret.
spoonbills
spoonbills
spoonbills
spoonbills
spoonbills
spoonbills
great blue heron
sandhill cranes
Two adult sandhill cranes were seen amidst the saltgrasses of Galveston's west end.
Great blue herons are a common sight just about anywhere there are bodies of water.
cormorant eating fish
cormorant eating fish
A cormorant catches a hefty-sized snack in the water of Surfside's beach.
The Texas coastline is graced with the Roseate Spoonbill. Absolute gorgeous long-legged wading birds, they stand nearly three feet tall. Their coloring ranges from white to a rosy pink, depending upon their age as well as, according to some scientists, the amount of carotenoids found in the shrimp they eat. Their unique bill is what gives them their name, flat and spreading at the end. Spoonbills eat in a sweeping motion, side to side, skimming the shallow muddy waters for small fish and crustaceans. They nest in colonies, are monogamous for only one season and have an average life span of ten years. They are not usually found much farther north than the Texas coast and are more plentiful farther south in Central and South America. In the 1800s they were hunted for their pink plumage, nearly to the point of extinction, to be worn as decoration in women's hats.
My Galveston page has earlier shots of many types of wading birds found in the area. Feel free to jump over to that page.

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